A classical analysis (Radio Swiss classic program)

I am not a classical music expert at all, but I happen to have friends who are, and am even married to someone playing the cello (and the ukulele!). I appreciate listening to such music from time to time, in particular Baroque music. A friend made me discover Radio Swiss classic, an online radio playing classical music all day and all night long, with a quite nice variety, and very little speaking between pieces, with no ads (thank you, funders of the radio!). Besides, the voices telling me which piece has just been played are really soothing, so Radio Swiss classic is a good one in my opinion.

Today, instead of anxiously waiting for the results of the French presidential elections, I decided to download the program of the radio in the last years and have a quick look at it, since after all, the website says that the radio aims at relaxing people.

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Sow the seeds, know the seeds

When you do simulations, for instance in R, e.g. drawing samples from a distribution, it’s best to set a random seed via the function set.seed in order to have reproducible results. The function has no default value. I think I mostly use set.seed(1). Last week I received an R script from a colleague in which he used a weird number in set.seed (maybe a phone number? or maybe he let his fingers type randomly?), which made me curious about the usual seed values. As in my blog post about initial commit messages I used the Github API via the gh package to get a very rough answer (an answer seedling from the question seed?).

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Mapping waxwings annual migration without Twitter

Recently a reader left a comment on this blog mentioning his cool blog post in which he mapped the spread of a migratory bird using Twitter. His data source was the Waxwings UK account which reports sightings of Bohemian waxwings in the UK. I decided to try reproducing and extending his work using the rOpenSci spocc package that interfaces different sources of species occurrence data.

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Faces of #rstats Twitter

This week I was impressed by this tweet where Daniel Pett, Digital Humanities Lead at the British Museum, presented a collage of Twitter profile pics of all his colleagues. He made this piece of art using R (for collecting the usernames) and Python. I’m a bit of an R fanatic (or a Python dummy…) so I decided to write a code in R only to make a collage of profile pics of Twitter #rstats users.

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Hundreds of Guardian blind dates

One of my more or less guilty pleasures is reading The Guardian blind date each week. I think I started doing this when living in Cambridge, England for five months. I would buy i every weekday and The Guardian week-end every week-end. I wasn’t even dating at the time I discovered The Guardian blind dates but I’ve always liked their format.

I get so much into each date report that seeing both participants say they want to meet again makes me ridiculously happy. I like wondering how matches were made, but today I just want to look into the contents of post-date interviews.

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